Uwe Kuipers (Gaffer) & Bert Pot (Director of Photography)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Illusion

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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Widening of the Haarlemmerhouttuinen
(only partially in use nowadays)

In the 1960s, the municipality planned to increase a two-lane motorway to four lanes, in the same direction as the railway tracks to the West of Central Station. For this addition, 640 houses, adjacent to the Haarlemmerhouttuinen and Haarlemmerplein, were torn down. A sum of almost 1500 residents were evicted from their homes as a result.

Opposing this move, residents criticised the redevelopment of the area, stating that ‘the wounds should be healed, the demolition works must be stopped’. In 1973, the municipality decided to reduce the number of lanes from four to two again and proposed that the vacant space be allocated to the use of social housing.

from series

Boondoggles exist in almost every city.

boondoggle is considered to be an unnecessary and wasteful object, continued because the politics and money involved in its demolition are placed in greater weight than its usefulness.

Boondoggles are often visualised as bridges to nowhere, motorway exits that end in mid-air and abandoned interchanges. Usually they are state-funded initiatives that for political and/or economical reasons stray from their original use. More often than not, local and national governments and clever individuals have redefined the spaces by finding a new use for them.

Together with urban historian Tim Verlaan, I started an inventory of Amsterdam’s boondoggles. Our aim is to map out their occurrences further afield as well.

All the pictures are shot on instant film, a well known process originated in the 1920’s and made popular by Polariod during the 1960’s and 1970’s. Instant film is still being used today by both professional and amateur photographers around the world because of its unique characteristics. After pulling the trigger and standing on the street for a few minutes holding the film in the dark corners of your coat, looking like your about to pull out a gun, you wait for a chemical process to develop the instant camera’s interpretation of what you captured. The outcome of instant film is never quite the same. Its chemical properties make it react and alter to its surroundings. This will determine the way it will look over the years. So what you see in the first instance isn’t necessarily what you’ll see years later.

 

*Boondoggles in De Volkskrant, 06/10/2010.

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Jesse. Kusadasi, Turkey.

from series

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Detroit, USA.

from series

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Jan Broekema (Set Production Assistant)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Peter van den Begin (Actor)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Uwe Kuipers (Gaffer)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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In Passion

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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Annemarie Prins (Actress) & Peter van den Begin (Actor)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Entrada

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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Marzahn, Berlin. DE.

from series

Social housing with Marquis Hawkes

“People think it’s a no-go zone,” says our guide while he drives us around Marzahn, a district on the north-eastern border of Berlin. It’s a sunny August afternoon and we’re about 15 kilometres from Alexanderplatz, being driven around in the Volkswagen Polo of a 40-year-old Mohawk-sporting Englishman, who is showing us around the area in which he lives. It’s an incredibly green and spacious scene, people are walking their dogs, and we hear the excited shouts of the many kids playing outside. And no matter where we look, there’s always a concrete Plattenbau high-rise in the backdrop. There are dozens and dozens of them, many of which have recently been renovated, dressed in fresh colours and looking crisp in the lush summer landscape.

Our guide is Mark Hawkins, better known as Marquis Hawkes, a DJ and a producer of soulful, club-ready house music. Having made music and DJ’d under different aliases since the nineties, he adopted his current pseudonym several years ago. In June, Marquis Hawkes’ debut album Social Housing dropped, an album inspired by the socialist housing estates of Marzahn, where he and his family moved four years ago. “Living in one of the poorest parts of Berlin had an effect on the sound of my album,” Hawkins says. “The backdrop of having people leading tough lives around me, alongside our own everyday struggle just to keep the bills paid and food on the table, it has that influence.” While he speeds his car through the sea of high-rises, we talk about living in Marzahn, housing policies, and how he relates to the scene in Berlin’s popular areas.

 

*Read full article by Mark Minkjan for Failed Architecture.
*Project featured on Thump.

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Salvador, Brazil.

from series

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Martijn Lakemeier (Actor)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Peter van den Begin as Dimitri

from series

For the second season of the Dutch television hit-series
‘Hollands Hoop’, I portrayed the main cast members in
character and in their fictional habitat.

hollandshoop.ntr.nl

Hollands Hoop on IMDB

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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New York, USA.

from series

Ongoing observations of human behavior and
the environment we create.

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Kim van Kooten as Machteld Augustinus

from series

For the second season of the Dutch television hit-series
‘Hollands Hoop’, I portrayed the main cast members in
character and in their fictional habitat.

hollandshoop.ntr.nl

Hollands Hoop on IMDB

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Las Vegas

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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Marc. Amsterdam, NL.

from series

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Phae. Rotterdam, NL.

from series

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Marzahn, Berlin. DE.

from series

Social housing with Marquis Hawkes

“People think it’s a no-go zone,” says our guide while he drives us around Marzahn, a district on the north-eastern border of Berlin. It’s a sunny August afternoon and we’re about 15 kilometres from Alexanderplatz, being driven around in the Volkswagen Polo of a 40-year-old Mohawk-sporting Englishman, who is showing us around the area in which he lives. It’s an incredibly green and spacious scene, people are walking their dogs, and we hear the excited shouts of the many kids playing outside. And no matter where we look, there’s always a concrete Plattenbau high-rise in the backdrop. There are dozens and dozens of them, many of which have recently been renovated, dressed in fresh colours and looking crisp in the lush summer landscape.

Our guide is Mark Hawkins, better known as Marquis Hawkes, a DJ and a producer of soulful, club-ready house music. Having made music and DJ’d under different aliases since the nineties, he adopted his current pseudonym several years ago. In June, Marquis Hawkes’ debut album Social Housing dropped, an album inspired by the socialist housing estates of Marzahn, where he and his family moved four years ago. “Living in one of the poorest parts of Berlin had an effect on the sound of my album,” Hawkins says. “The backdrop of having people leading tough lives around me, alongside our own everyday struggle just to keep the bills paid and food on the table, it has that influence.” While he speeds his car through the sea of high-rises, we talk about living in Marzahn, housing policies, and how he relates to the scene in Berlin’s popular areas.

 

*Read full article by Mark Minkjan for Failed Architecture.
*Project featured on Thump.

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Marcel Hensema (Actor)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Tim. Amstelveen, NL.

from series

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Capri

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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Christal Palace

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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New York, USA.

from series

Ongoing observations of human behavior and
the environment we create.

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Loves Day

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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Martijn Lakemeier (Actor)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

from series

Ongoing observations of human behavior and
the environment we create.

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Bert Pot (Director of Photography), Kaspar Burghard (Grip) & Mark du Plessis (1st Assistant Camera)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Antoin Cox (Sound Mixer) Bert Pot (Director of Photography) Ari Hemelaar (1st AD)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Justus Engelbracht (Clapper/Loader)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Rail line overpass near the Gein area, providing a direct link between the A6 and A9 motorways.
(nowadays a tunnel for cyclists and pedestrians)

In the 1960s it was proposed to expand Amsterdam’s motorway network by constructing a road which would provide a direct link between Flevoland, the A6 and A9 motorways. The road would pass through the green area to the Southeast of Amsterdam.

After a slow decision-making process and protests held by local residents and environmentalists, the national government devised an alternative plan to expand the existing road network. This solution did not require the use of the rail line overpass, which had already been constructed. Cyclists and pedestrians use it today, by which it exhibits a rare occurrence where space is overprovided for the users due to its initial purpose altering.

from series

Boondoggles exist in almost every city.

boondoggle is considered to be an unnecessary and wasteful object, continued because the politics and money involved in its demolition are placed in greater weight than its usefulness.

Boondoggles are often visualised as bridges to nowhere, motorway exits that end in mid-air and abandoned interchanges. Usually they are state-funded initiatives that for political and/or economical reasons stray from their original use. More often than not, local and national governments and clever individuals have redefined the spaces by finding a new use for them.

Together with urban historian Tim Verlaan, I started an inventory of Amsterdam’s boondoggles. Our aim is to map out their occurrences further afield as well.

All the pictures are shot on instant film, a well known process originated in the 1920’s and made popular by Polariod during the 1960’s and 1970’s. Instant film is still being used today by both professional and amateur photographers around the world because of its unique characteristics. After pulling the trigger and standing on the street for a few minutes holding the film in the dark corners of your coat, looking like your about to pull out a gun, you wait for a chemical process to develop the instant camera’s interpretation of what you captured. The outcome of instant film is never quite the same. Its chemical properties make it react and alter to its surroundings. This will determine the way it will look over the years. So what you see in the first instance isn’t necessarily what you’ll see years later.

 

*Boondoggles in De Volkskrant, 06/10/2010.

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Marzahn, Berlin. DE.

from series

Social housing with Marquis Hawkes

“People think it’s a no-go zone,” says our guide while he drives us around Marzahn, a district on the north-eastern border of Berlin. It’s a sunny August afternoon and we’re about 15 kilometres from Alexanderplatz, being driven around in the Volkswagen Polo of a 40-year-old Mohawk-sporting Englishman, who is showing us around the area in which he lives. It’s an incredibly green and spacious scene, people are walking their dogs, and we hear the excited shouts of the many kids playing outside. And no matter where we look, there’s always a concrete Plattenbau high-rise in the backdrop. There are dozens and dozens of them, many of which have recently been renovated, dressed in fresh colours and looking crisp in the lush summer landscape.

Our guide is Mark Hawkins, better known as Marquis Hawkes, a DJ and a producer of soulful, club-ready house music. Having made music and DJ’d under different aliases since the nineties, he adopted his current pseudonym several years ago. In June, Marquis Hawkes’ debut album Social Housing dropped, an album inspired by the socialist housing estates of Marzahn, where he and his family moved four years ago. “Living in one of the poorest parts of Berlin had an effect on the sound of my album,” Hawkins says. “The backdrop of having people leading tough lives around me, alongside our own everyday struggle just to keep the bills paid and food on the table, it has that influence.” While he speeds his car through the sea of high-rises, we talk about living in Marzahn, housing policies, and how he relates to the scene in Berlin’s popular areas.

 

*Read full article by Mark Minkjan for Failed Architecture.
*Project featured on Thump.

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Amsterdam, NL.

from series

Ongoing observations of human behavior and
the environment we create.

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Stairway to Heaven

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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Brasilia, Brazil.

from series

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Marcel Hensema (Actor)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Richt Martens (2nd Assistant Director / Script Continuity)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Marzahn, Berlin. DE.

from series

Social housing with Marquis Hawkes

“People think it’s a no-go zone,” says our guide while he drives us around Marzahn, a district on the north-eastern border of Berlin. It’s a sunny August afternoon and we’re about 15 kilometres from Alexanderplatz, being driven around in the Volkswagen Polo of a 40-year-old Mohawk-sporting Englishman, who is showing us around the area in which he lives. It’s an incredibly green and spacious scene, people are walking their dogs, and we hear the excited shouts of the many kids playing outside. And no matter where we look, there’s always a concrete Plattenbau high-rise in the backdrop. There are dozens and dozens of them, many of which have recently been renovated, dressed in fresh colours and looking crisp in the lush summer landscape.

Our guide is Mark Hawkins, better known as Marquis Hawkes, a DJ and a producer of soulful, club-ready house music. Having made music and DJ’d under different aliases since the nineties, he adopted his current pseudonym several years ago. In June, Marquis Hawkes’ debut album Social Housing dropped, an album inspired by the socialist housing estates of Marzahn, where he and his family moved four years ago. “Living in one of the poorest parts of Berlin had an effect on the sound of my album,” Hawkins says. “The backdrop of having people leading tough lives around me, alongside our own everyday struggle just to keep the bills paid and food on the table, it has that influence.” While he speeds his car through the sea of high-rises, we talk about living in Marzahn, housing policies, and how he relates to the scene in Berlin’s popular areas.

 

*Read full article by Mark Minkjan for Failed Architecture.
*Project featured on Thump.

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Jesse. Amsterdam, NL.

from series

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Soccer Pitch. Amazon, Brazil.

from series

Ongoing observations of human behavior and
the environment we create.

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from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Jesse. New York, U.S.

 

 

from series

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Belém, Brazil.

from series

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Lizelotte. Amsterdam, NL.

from series

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Marzahn, Berlin. DE.

from series

Social housing with Marquis Hawkes

“People think it’s a no-go zone,” says our guide while he drives us around Marzahn, a district on the north-eastern border of Berlin. It’s a sunny August afternoon and we’re about 15 kilometres from Alexanderplatz, being driven around in the Volkswagen Polo of a 40-year-old Mohawk-sporting Englishman, who is showing us around the area in which he lives. It’s an incredibly green and spacious scene, people are walking their dogs, and we hear the excited shouts of the many kids playing outside. And no matter where we look, there’s always a concrete Plattenbau high-rise in the backdrop. There are dozens and dozens of them, many of which have recently been renovated, dressed in fresh colours and looking crisp in the lush summer landscape.

Our guide is Mark Hawkins, better known as Marquis Hawkes, a DJ and a producer of soulful, club-ready house music. Having made music and DJ’d under different aliases since the nineties, he adopted his current pseudonym several years ago. In June, Marquis Hawkes’ debut album Social Housing dropped, an album inspired by the socialist housing estates of Marzahn, where he and his family moved four years ago. “Living in one of the poorest parts of Berlin had an effect on the sound of my album,” Hawkins says. “The backdrop of having people leading tough lives around me, alongside our own everyday struggle just to keep the bills paid and food on the table, it has that influence.” While he speeds his car through the sea of high-rises, we talk about living in Marzahn, housing policies, and how he relates to the scene in Berlin’s popular areas.

 

*Read full article by Mark Minkjan for Failed Architecture.
*Project featured on Thump.

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Classe A

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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INFO

Cursor

Marcel Hensema (Actor)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Rotterdam, NL.

from series

Ongoing observations of human behavior and
the environment we create.

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Chicago, U.S.

from series

Ongoing observations of human behavior and
the environment we create.

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Amsterdam, NL.

from series

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Liselotte Bredero (Hair & Make Up), Sjors op den Kelder (Line Producer) & Kim Oomen (Executive Producer)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Uwe Kuipers (Gaffer)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Grand Prix

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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New York, USA.

from series

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Alfa

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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INFO

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Barreirinhas, Brazil.

from series

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Detroit, USA.

from series

Ongoing observations of human behavior and
the environment we create.

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Stop Time

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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INFO

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One Way

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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Jur Oster & Giel Born (Best Boy)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Rotterdam, NL.

from series

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Abdi. Amsterdam, NL

from series

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Alter do Chão, Brazil.

from series

Ongoing observations of human behavior and
the environment we create.

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Kim van Kooten, Marcel Hensema, Martijn Lakemeier, Megan de Kruijf and Amber Berentsen as the Augustinus family.

from series

For the second season of the Dutch television hit-series
‘Hollands Hoop’, I portrayed the main cast members in
character and in their fictional habitat.

hollandshoop.ntr.nl

Hollands Hoop on IMDB

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Kings

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

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Manchester, U.K.

from series

Ongoing observations of human behavior and
the environment we create.

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INFO

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Love Tour

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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INFO

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Le Royale

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Cursor

Moments

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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INFO

Cursor

Five Stars

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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INFO

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Manchester, U.K.

from series

Ongoing observations of human behavior and
the environment we create.

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Chicago, USA.

from series

Ongoing observations of human behavior and
the environment we create.

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Where’s Wally. Prague, Czech Republic.

from series

Ongoing observations of human behavior and
the environment we create.

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Detroit, USA.

 

from series

Ongoing observations of human behavior and
the environment we create.

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INFO

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Love Land

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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Jesse, Amsterdam, NL.

from series

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Lindelotte van der Meer (Assistant Hair & Make Up)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Karysma

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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Soccer pitch. Barreirinhas, Brazil.

from series

Ongoing observations of human behavior and
the environment we create.

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Eternity

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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Eva Weerts (Art Department Trainee), Vera van der Sandt (Art Director), Sander de Vries (Art Department Runner), Marius Touwen (Assistant Art Department), Ida Doodeman (Hand Props)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Carpe Diem

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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Raampoort bridge near Tweede Hugo de Grootstraat.
(meant as a thoroughfare between the redeveloped Jordaan neighbourhood and the inner city; has been put to use partially)

In the 1960s a bridge was renovated and widened to make the popular route between Rozengracht – Marnixstraat – Raampoort – Jan van Galenstraat – ring road A10 more accessible. When in use, it was realised that the corner cars had to turn between Raampoort and Rozengracht was itself too narrow to accommodate the increase in traffic. Cars were therefore directed in and out of the city via alternative routes.

Nowadays, the bridge is rarely used as a thoroughfare. Its original intention is still quite explicit through its extra lanes and unnecessarily broad sidewalks.

from series

Boondoggles exist in almost every city.

boondoggle is considered to be an unnecessary and wasteful object, continued because the politics and money involved in its demolition are placed in greater weight than its usefulness.

Boondoggles are often visualised as bridges to nowhere, motorway exits that end in mid-air and abandoned interchanges. Usually they are state-funded initiatives that for political and/or economical reasons stray from their original use. More often than not, local and national governments and clever individuals have redefined the spaces by finding a new use for them.

Together with urban historian Tim Verlaan, I started an inventory of Amsterdam’s boondoggles. Our aim is to map out their occurrences further afield as well.

All the pictures are shot on instant film, a well known process originated in the 1920’s and made popular by Polariod during the 1960’s and 1970’s. Instant film is still being used today by both professional and amateur photographers around the world because of its unique characteristics. After pulling the trigger and standing on the street for a few minutes holding the film in the dark corners of your coat, looking like your about to pull out a gun, you wait for a chemical process to develop the instant camera’s interpretation of what you captured. The outcome of instant film is never quite the same. Its chemical properties make it react and alter to its surroundings. This will determine the way it will look over the years. So what you see in the first instance isn’t necessarily what you’ll see years later.

 

*Boondoggles in De Volkskrant, 06/10/2010.

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Frenky Ribbens (Writer) & Dana Nechushtan (Director)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Free Way

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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INFO

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Sabrina Carli (Lighting Trainee)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Roland Schutte (3rd Assistant Director)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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INFO

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Venus

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Cursor

New York, USA.

from series

Ongoing observations of human behavior and
the environment we create.

BACK

INFO

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Scala

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Cursor

New York, USA.

from series

Ongoing observations of human behavior and
the environment we create.

BACK

INFO

Cursor

Marzahn, Berlin. DE.

from series

Social housing with Marquis Hawkes

“People think it’s a no-go zone,” says our guide while he drives us around Marzahn, a district on the north-eastern border of Berlin. It’s a sunny August afternoon and we’re about 15 kilometres from Alexanderplatz, being driven around in the Volkswagen Polo of a 40-year-old Mohawk-sporting Englishman, who is showing us around the area in which he lives. It’s an incredibly green and spacious scene, people are walking their dogs, and we hear the excited shouts of the many kids playing outside. And no matter where we look, there’s always a concrete Plattenbau high-rise in the backdrop. There are dozens and dozens of them, many of which have recently been renovated, dressed in fresh colours and looking crisp in the lush summer landscape.

Our guide is Mark Hawkins, better known as Marquis Hawkes, a DJ and a producer of soulful, club-ready house music. Having made music and DJ’d under different aliases since the nineties, he adopted his current pseudonym several years ago. In June, Marquis Hawkes’ debut album Social Housing dropped, an album inspired by the socialist housing estates of Marzahn, where he and his family moved four years ago. “Living in one of the poorest parts of Berlin had an effect on the sound of my album,” Hawkins says. “The backdrop of having people leading tough lives around me, alongside our own everyday struggle just to keep the bills paid and food on the table, it has that influence.” While he speeds his car through the sea of high-rises, we talk about living in Marzahn, housing policies, and how he relates to the scene in Berlin’s popular areas.

 

*Read full article by Mark Minkjan for Failed Architecture.
*Project featured on Thump.

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Simply Red

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Cursor

Desejos

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Cursor

Marzahn, Berlin. DE.

from series

Social housing with Marquis Hawkes

“People think it’s a no-go zone,” says our guide while he drives us around Marzahn, a district on the north-eastern border of Berlin. It’s a sunny August afternoon and we’re about 15 kilometres from Alexanderplatz, being driven around in the Volkswagen Polo of a 40-year-old Mohawk-sporting Englishman, who is showing us around the area in which he lives. It’s an incredibly green and spacious scene, people are walking their dogs, and we hear the excited shouts of the many kids playing outside. And no matter where we look, there’s always a concrete Plattenbau high-rise in the backdrop. There are dozens and dozens of them, many of which have recently been renovated, dressed in fresh colours and looking crisp in the lush summer landscape.

Our guide is Mark Hawkins, better known as Marquis Hawkes, a DJ and a producer of soulful, club-ready house music. Having made music and DJ’d under different aliases since the nineties, he adopted his current pseudonym several years ago. In June, Marquis Hawkes’ debut album Social Housing dropped, an album inspired by the socialist housing estates of Marzahn, where he and his family moved four years ago. “Living in one of the poorest parts of Berlin had an effect on the sound of my album,” Hawkins says. “The backdrop of having people leading tough lives around me, alongside our own everyday struggle just to keep the bills paid and food on the table, it has that influence.” While he speeds his car through the sea of high-rises, we talk about living in Marzahn, housing policies, and how he relates to the scene in Berlin’s popular areas.

 

*Read full article by Mark Minkjan for Failed Architecture.
*Project featured on Thump.

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Sweet Dreams

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Cursor

Peter van den Begin (Actor)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Martijn Lakemeier (Actor) & Dana Nechushtan (Director)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

BACK

INFO

Cursor

Marquis Hawkes. Marzahn, Berlin. DE.

from series

Social housing with Marquis Hawkes

“People think it’s a no-go zone,” says our guide while he drives us around Marzahn, a district on the north-eastern border of Berlin. It’s a sunny August afternoon and we’re about 15 kilometres from Alexanderplatz, being driven around in the Volkswagen Polo of a 40-year-old Mohawk-sporting Englishman, who is showing us around the area in which he lives. It’s an incredibly green and spacious scene, people are walking their dogs, and we hear the excited shouts of the many kids playing outside. And no matter where we look, there’s always a concrete Plattenbau high-rise in the backdrop. There are dozens and dozens of them, many of which have recently been renovated, dressed in fresh colours and looking crisp in the lush summer landscape.

Our guide is Mark Hawkins, better known as Marquis Hawkes, a DJ and a producer of soulful, club-ready house music. Having made music and DJ’d under different aliases since the nineties, he adopted his current pseudonym several years ago. In June, Marquis Hawkes’ debut album Social Housing dropped, an album inspired by the socialist housing estates of Marzahn, where he and his family moved four years ago. “Living in one of the poorest parts of Berlin had an effect on the sound of my album,” Hawkins says. “The backdrop of having people leading tough lives around me, alongside our own everyday struggle just to keep the bills paid and food on the table, it has that influence.” While he speeds his car through the sea of high-rises, we talk about living in Marzahn, housing policies, and how he relates to the scene in Berlin’s popular areas.

 

*Read full article by Mark Minkjan for Failed Architecture.
*Project featured on Thump.

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Novo Plano

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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Amsterdam, NL.

from series

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from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Sweet

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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Hollands Hope

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Stall keeper. Manaus, Brazil.

from series

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Rotterdam, NL.

from series

Ongoing observations of human behavior and
the environment we create.

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Alibi

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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INFO

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from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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New York, USA.

from series

Ongoing observations of human behavior and
the environment we create.

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Berlin, Germany.

from series

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Hadewych Minis as Liesbeth

from series

For the second season of the Dutch television hit-series
‘Hollands Hoop’, I portrayed the main cast members in
character and in their fictional habitat.

hollandshoop.ntr.nl

Hollands Hoop on IMDB

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ian & Neeltje (Catering)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Happy End

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

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Mark du Plessis (1st Assistant Camera)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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Aart. Amsterdam, NL.

from series

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Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

from series

Ongoing observations of human behavior and
the environment we create.

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Salvador, Brazil.

from series

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Nikola Djuricko (Actor)

from series

For over ten years now, I have been active in the film industry, working on features, commercials, shorts and corporate films. Across all of these settings, what is evident is the remarkable visual friction between the fictional world we create and the daily world that we all inhabit. In the summer, we shoot snowy Christmas scenes; during wintertime, a sunny moment in an Eastern world. What strikes me most is how fast we, as human beings, are able to adapt to situations that seem absurd to outsiders. For people working on film sets, fiction becomes a very real part of daily life, making reality interact with fiction in the most normal and therefore strangest of ways.

 

During a 76 day shoot, I decided to document the “reality” of a film set and the fiction of a drama, using only my smartphone. The idea was to capture one special moment during each shooting day and then sharing this image with the cast, crew and fans through social media. The shooting period, which entailed no less than 1,000 hours of close collaboration, offered me the opportunity to come extremely close to my objects of interest and become a true “fly on the wall.” This has resulted in a series of intimate portraits as well as bizarre snapshots, each of which blur the line between fiction and reality.

 

*Hollands Hoop on IMDB.
*Hollands Hoop exposition in De Balie.
*Hollands Hoop in (local newspaper) De Eemsbode.
*Hollands Hoop on LensCulture.
‘Shot with the cinéma vérité-style of a smartphone, this daily series of “candid” photos pierces the slick facade of film-making while causing us to question the distinction between reality and performance in our own lives.’ -LensCulture-

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