Xanadu

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Venus

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Sweet Dreams

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Sweet Cherry

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Sweet

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Style

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Stop Time

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Status

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Stairway to Heaven

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Simply Red

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Secrets

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Scala

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

San Diego

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Playboy

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Pit Stop

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Paraiso de Bebe

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Paraiso

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

One Way

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Oasis

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Novo Plano

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

My Dream

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Moments

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Luxemburgo

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Lumini

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Loves Day

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Love Tour

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Love Land

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Life

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Le Royale

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Las Vegas

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Kings

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Karysma

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

In Passion

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Illusion

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Hobby

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Happy End

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Granville

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Grand Prix

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Free Way

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Five Stars

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Feelings

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Exotico

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Executive

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Eternity

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Entrada

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Endless Love

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Encontros

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Diamantes

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Desejos

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Christal Palace

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Classe A

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Casual

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Carpe Diem

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Carinhoso

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Capri

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Alibi

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

Alfa

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO

24 Horas

from series

Brazilians are passionate people. They’re not afraid to show their bodies or express their sensuality publicly, as evidenced by their exuberant celebrations of Carnival each February. Infidelity is commonly thought about, if not openly practiced. Paradoxically, having multiple partners, homosexuality and other nonconventional relationships, remain in conflict with the more dominant, conservative values that run deep beneath the country’s carnal reputation.

Large families often live together in small, cramped houses, where it’s difficult to find privacy. Young Brazilians, who tend to live at home until they marry, cannot bring their partners back home for sex. And regardless of their sexual proclivities, most Brazilians prefer to avoid a personal reputation for promiscuity, and hence, a desire to express the full range of their sexuality, discreetly and in private.

Brazilian love motels are everywhere; in urban and rural areas, even in the jungle. These tantalizing (if somewhat cheesy) “romantic escapes” offer an exciting alternative to having sex outdoors (a common practice in Brazil). They’re usually surrounded by high walls but are still easily recognized by evocative names, like “Red Love”, “Stop Time”, “Tropicál” and “Álibi”, flashing in colorful neon at the gate. Driven by a shared fascination with Brazil’s culture of love, Vera van de Sandt (art director) and myself documented the authentic interiors of Brazilian Love Motels over a two-year period, just as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics threatened to transform them into soulless tourist facilities. With the resulting photographic series “Love Land Stop Time” they capture a fascinating and provocative cultural phenomenon in paradox.

 

Limited C-prints mounted on aluminium are available
in sizes 30x30cm / 60x60cm, in edition of 8. The project also features a publication including 4 full-color prints [16x23cm], a poster and a 8 page leparello. For additional info about options and prizes please contact us at: lovelandstoptime@gmail.com

 

*Love Land Stop Time Facebook page.

 

*Love Land Stop Time in the media:
The Huffington Post
Vice
Dezeen
New Dawn Newspaper
GUP Magazine
Failed Architecture
Life Framer
CityLab
Hyperallergic
Baunetzwoche
Fastcodesign

BACK

INFO